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dc.contributor.authorNakling, Arne
dc.contributor.authorÅrsland, Dag
dc.contributor.authorNæss, Halvor
dc.contributor.authorWollschläger, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorFladby, Tormod
dc.contributor.authorHofstad, Håkon
dc.contributor.authorEike, Wehling
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-15T09:05:17Z
dc.date.available2019-07-15T09:05:17Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationNakling, A. E., Aarsland, D., Næss, H., Wollschlaeger, D., Fladby, T., Hofstad, H., & Wehling, E. (2017). Cognitive deficits in chronic stroke patients: neuropsychological assessment, depression, and self-reports. Dementia and geriatric cognitive disorders extra, 7(2), 283-296.en
dc.identifier.issn1664-5464 
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10642/7305
dc.description.abstractBackground: Following stroke, clinicians are challenged to detect and untangle symptoms of cognitive dysfunction and mood disorders. Additionally, they need to evaluate the informative value of self-reports to identify patients in need of further attendance. Aims: To examine the association between neuropsychological measures, symptoms of depression, and self-reported cognitive function. Methods: One-hundred and five chronic stroke patients underwent assessment covering 6 cognitive domains and answered the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Memory and Thinking Scale from the Stroke Impact Scale 1 year after stroke. Age and gender difference in cognitive impairment were examined; linear regression was used to predict depression scores. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were used to validate self-reported functioning against performance on cognitive tests. Results: Cognitive impairment was observed in 60% of the patients in at least 1 cognitive domain. Cognitive performance was associated with symptoms of depression as well as with self-reported cognitive function. The final analyses revealed low sensitivity and specificity for the Memory and Thinking subscale from the Stroke Impact Scale. Conclusion: Cognitive impairment occurs frequently even in patients in a chronic phase after stroke and predicts symptoms of depression. Using the Stroke Impact Scale, clinicians should be aware of low sensitivity of self-reported cognitive function.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherKargeren
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra;7(2)
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States This is an open access article, originally published at http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000478851en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectArtikkelen
dc.subjectVDP::Medisinske Fag: 700en
dc.titleCognitive deficits in chronic stroke patients: neuropsychological assessment, depression, and self-reportsen
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typePeer revieweden
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000478851
dc.identifier.cristinID1512288


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
This is an open access article, originally published at http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000478851
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States This is an open access article, originally published at http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000478851